Pedant

Pedant

This one gets so far up my nose I could sneeze.

Set to forward all incoming requests irregardless of type.

Irregardless is a new word which is not only not a word (ok Billy, steady…) but manages to contain its very own double-negative.

So guys, just for the record. Irregardless is not a word it is a concatenation of two perfectly serviceable English words; irrespective and regardless so would you please stop using it!

(and if, as I suspect it may, find a home in the O.E.D. I wonder how its definition might end up reading)

20 July 2005–As ever, Billy has the answer

PS Here's the Merriam-Webster entry for 'irregardless': Main Entry: ir·re·gard·less
Pronunciation: "ir-i-\'gärd-l&s
Function: adverb
Etymology: probably blend of irrespective and regardless
nonstandard : REGARDLESS
usage Irregardless originated in dialectal American speech in the early 20th century. Its fairly widespread use in speech called it to the attention of usage commentators as early as 1927. The most frequently repeated remark about it is that "there is no such word." There is such a word, however. It is still used primarily in speech, although it can be found from time to time in edited prose. Its reputation has not risen over the years, and it is still a long way from general acceptance. Use regardless instead. PPS I wouldn't use 'irregardless' myself as I think simpler is always better (e.g. I use American English 'orient' more often than British English 'orientate') but I don't think double negatives are necessarily bad. 'Negative concord' is what linguists call two or more negatives making a negative. It's not part of Standard English or lots of Southern English dialects but they are part of lots of dialects of English (including Scottish ones), not to mention French of course, n'est-ce pas? PPPS Actually, I don't think I'd use 'regardless' either. What's wrong with 'nevermind'? B-)